Call for booze ban in airports

Are you even on holiday if you don’t snap a photo of your pint in the Wetherspoons in departures? Whether you’re taking off at 6am or 9pm, a cheeky drink (or six) is very much a part of the holiday experience for Brits flying abroad every year.

Airports, unlike pubs and supermarkets, don’t have strict licensing laws – they can serve and sell alcohol at any time of day. And, as a result, the number of alcohol-related arrests in UK airports and in the air are at an all-time high, as revealed in last night’s Panorama – they’ve gone up by 50% in the space of a year.

And now there’s a call for stricter laws regarding booze in airports and in the air.

Earlier in the summer, the Balearic islands, including Mallorca and Ibiza, asked Spain and the EU to ban alcohol on flights in a bid to battle ‘anti-social tourism’.

And now budget airline Ryanair are getting on board, calling for a booze band before 10am in airports, and limiting the number of drinks sold to each passenger.

Drunk passengers are more inclined to get into fights, and abuse airport and airline staff. A survey revealed that the majority of cabin crew have witnessed drunken and disruptive behaviour on board flights.

In 2016, the Civil Aviation Authority introduced a new code of conduct to try tackle anti-social behaviour in airports, but the new BBC investigation has shown it’s had little impact.

Ryanair say that bars and restaurants supplying unlimited alcohol is a big part of the problem, and propose that boarding cards should be produced when purchasing alcohol, capping it at two drinks per passenger.

“It’s completely unfair that airports can profit from the unlimited sale of alcohol to passengers and leave the airlines to deal with the safety consequences,” Ryanair marketing director Kenny Jacobs said.

“This is a particular problem during flight delays when airports apply no limit to the sale of alcohol in airside bars and restaurants. This is an issue which the airports must now address and we are calling for significant changes to prohibit the sale of alcohol at airports, particularly with early morning flights and when flights are delayed.”

“This is a particular problem during flight delays when airports apply no limit to the sale of alcohol in airside bars and restaurants. This is an issue which the airports must now address and we are calling for significant changes to prohibit the sale of alcohol at airports, particularly with early morning flights and when flights are delayed.”

What’s your experience of drinking at airports? Is it a part of your holiday? Or have you been put off by out-of-control passengers? Tell us your view on Twitter, @FamilyLifeScot

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